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projects [2019/02/04 10:11]
Michele Bannister public:summer_studentships2019:projects renamed to projects
projects [2019/02/04 10:13]
Michele Bannister
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-===Lightcurves of Near-Earth Objects from ATLAS===+====== 2019 Projects ====== 
 + 
 +====Lightcurves of Near-Earth Objects from ATLAS====
  
 The ATLAS project discovers >100 Near-Earth Objects each year, and observes many others in its wide-field imaging survey. Astrometry and photometry is automatically reported to the Minor Planet Centre, but little photometric analysis of the NEOs have been done to date. This project will involve analysing the ATLAS photometry of NEOs,to investigate whether measurement of NEO spins with ATLAS will be worthwhile to pursue. The ATLAS project discovers >100 Near-Earth Objects each year, and observes many others in its wide-field imaging survey. Astrometry and photometry is automatically reported to the Minor Planet Centre, but little photometric analysis of the NEOs have been done to date. This project will involve analysing the ATLAS photometry of NEOs,to investigate whether measurement of NEO spins with ATLAS will be worthwhile to pursue.
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-===Measuring the transverse extent of solar coronal loops===+====Measuring the transverse extent of solar coronal loops====
  
 Abstract: Bright arc-like structures extending away from the Sun, when seen in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths,​ are called coronal loops. The plasma within the loops is denser giving them a brighter appearance, as compared to their surroundings. It is often believed that there are sub-resolution strands within the coronal loops. The transverse extent of a coronal loop is an important parameter to understand its collective behaviour. This project involves dealing with state-of-the-art imaging data from both space-based missions (e.g., SDO) and rocket-borne experiments (e.g., Hi-C), mainly to identify distinct coronal loops and measure their widths. Different statistical distributions that may be obtained from the results, are expected to have interesting implications on coronal heating scales. Abstract: Bright arc-like structures extending away from the Sun, when seen in extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) wavelengths,​ are called coronal loops. The plasma within the loops is denser giving them a brighter appearance, as compared to their surroundings. It is often believed that there are sub-resolution strands within the coronal loops. The transverse extent of a coronal loop is an important parameter to understand its collective behaviour. This project involves dealing with state-of-the-art imaging data from both space-based missions (e.g., SDO) and rocket-borne experiments (e.g., Hi-C), mainly to identify distinct coronal loops and measure their widths. Different statistical distributions that may be obtained from the results, are expected to have interesting implications on coronal heating scales.
projects.txt · Last modified: 2019/02/04 10:13 by Michele Bannister

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