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public:research_areas:solar_physics:rosa_data_transfer [2013/09/02 11:32]
Robert Ryans created
public:research_areas:solar_physics:rosa_data_transfer [2013/09/02 11:35] (current)
Robert Ryans
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 ====== Formatting ====== ====== Formatting ======
  
-The ROSA computers run RedHat Enterprise Linux 4, and only understand the Linux ext2 or ext3 formats. Third party software is available to permit such disks to be read under Mac OS X and Windows, or you can mount them using a virtual machine. In case you need to format disks while at the telescope, here is how you can do so from the ROSA computers. This is a standard Linux partition and format routine and can be done on any modern Linux system - ask your systems manager if in doubt. Note once more that ROSA only supports disks of up to 2TB.+The ROSA computers run RedHat Enterprise Linux 4, and only understand the Linux ext2 or ext3 formats. Third party software is available to permit such disks to be read under Mac OS X and Windows, or you can mount them using a virtual machine. In case you need to format disks while at the telescope, here is how you can do so from the ROSA computers. This is a standard Linux partition and format routine and can be done on any modern Linux system - ask your systems manager if in doubt. Note once more that ROSA only supports disks of up to **2TB**. 
 + 
 +  - Log onto das1 or das2 as root using the credentials in the ROSA user guide 
 +  - //Before// plugging the external drive into the eSATA interface, run the command **fdisk -l** which will give you a list of all known drives and partitions on the system 
 +  - Plug the drive into the eSATA port and turn it on 
 +  - Re-run the **fdisk -l** command, and verify that a new drive of the capacity you expect has been added to the list. It will likely have a name of the form **/​dev/​sdX** where X is a letter such as d or e. 
 +  - Type **fdisk /dev/sdX** replacing X as appropriate to start the fdisk partitioning package 
 +  - Within fdisk you can type: 
 +    * p to print the current partition map 
 +    * d to delete a numbered partition 
 +    * n to create a new partition 
 +    * w to quit and write the new partition map to disk 
 +    * q to quit without making changes 
 +  - If any partitions exist on the drive it's best to remove them all using **d**, then write to disk using **w** and restart fdisk. 
 +  - Create a single new primary partition by typing **n** and then accepting the default values, then **w** to write the partition map to disk and exit fdisk. 
 +  - To format the partition type **mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdX1** replacing X as needed.
  
-Log onto das1 or das2 as root using the credentials in the ROSA user guide 
-Before plugging the external drive into the eSATA interface, run the command fdisk -l which will give you a list of all known drives and partitions on the system 
-Plug the drive into the eSATA port and turn it on 
-Re-run the fdisk -l command, and verify that a new drive of the capacity you expect has been added to the list. It will likely have a name of the form /dev/sdX where X is a letter such as d or e. 
-Type fdisk /dev/sdX replacing X as appropriate to start the fdisk partitioning package 
-Within fdisk you can type: 
-p to print the current partition map 
-d to delete a numbered partition 
-n to create a new partition 
-w to quit and write the new partition map to disk 
-q to quit without making changes 
-If any partitions exist on the drive it's best to remove them all using the d command, then write to disk using w and restart fdisk. 
-Create a single new primary partition by typing n and then accepting the default values, then w to write the partition map to disk and exit fdisk. 
-To format the partition type mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdX1 replacing X as needed. 
 You should now be able to mount the formatted disk and check the available capacity by typing: You should now be able to mount the formatted disk and check the available capacity by typing:
-mount /dev/sdX1 /mnt +  * mount /dev/sdX1 /mnt 
-df -lh /mnt +  ​* ​df -lh /mnt 
-Finally you may unmount the drive (if needed) by typing umount /mnt at which point the drive may be unplugged.+ 
 +Finally you may unmount the drive (if needed) by typing ​**umount /mnt** at which point the drive may be unplugged.
  
public/research_areas/solar_physics/rosa_data_transfer.txt · Last modified: 2013/09/02 11:35 by Robert Ryans

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