Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
public:research_areas:solar_physics:ukieri [2013/09/06 12:59]
Robert Ryans
public:research_areas:solar_physics:ukieri [2013/09/06 13:01] (current)
Robert Ryans
Line 7: Line 7:
 {{:​public:​research_areas:​solar_physics:​iia_logo.png?​nolink|}} {{:​public:​research_areas:​solar_physics:​iia_logo.png?​nolink|}}
  
-{{:public:research_areas:solar_physics:​magfield.jpg?nolink|}}+  * [[http://​www.qub.ac.uk/​|Queen'​s University Belfast]] 
 +  * [[http://​www.nso.edu/​|National Solar Observatory]] 
 +  * [[http://​www.iaap.res.in/|Indian Institute of Astrophysics]]
  
 =====Overview of the Project===== =====Overview of the Project=====
-{{http://​www.usc.edu/​dept/​space_science/​links/​magfield.jpg?​nolink&​350x300 |(c) NASA  }} 
-The Sun is the most important astronomical object for humankind with solar activity driving space weather and having profound effects on our climate and communications. It is important to understand such activity and the energy transfer from the solar interior to the outer atmosphere and beyond. To investigate,​ and ultimately predict, solar activity, we need to observe and model physical processes in the solar atmosphere in their intrinsic scales. This is vital if we want to understand how small-scale solar activity influences large scale phenomena such as large solar eruptions which have a direct impact on the terrestrial environment. 
  
 +[{{:​public:​research_areas:​solar_physics:​magfield.jpg?​nolink|The Sun-Earth magnetic fields}}]
  
 +The Sun is the most important astronomical object for humankind with solar activity driving space weather and having profound effects on our climate and communications. It is important to understand such activity and the energy transfer from the solar interior to the outer atmosphere and beyond. To investigate,​ and ultimately predict, solar activity, we need to observe and model physical processes in the solar atmosphere in their intrinsic scales. This is vital if we want to understand how small-scale solar activity influences large scale phenomena such as large solar eruptions which have a direct impact on the terrestrial environment.
  
 The next few years will see the development and operation of state-of-the-art ground-based solar facilities. These facilities include the US led Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), the European Solar Telescope (EST), India’s National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) etc. The large aperture and state-of-the-art instrumentation of these facilities will produce the sharpest solar images and reveal the mysteries of the Sun’s atmosphere and interior at an unprecedented level of detail. Visual Broadband Imagers will be the first light instruments in all these telescopes. The next few years will see the development and operation of state-of-the-art ground-based solar facilities. These facilities include the US led Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST), the European Solar Telescope (EST), India’s National Large Solar Telescope (NLST) etc. The large aperture and state-of-the-art instrumentation of these facilities will produce the sharpest solar images and reveal the mysteries of the Sun’s atmosphere and interior at an unprecedented level of detail. Visual Broadband Imagers will be the first light instruments in all these telescopes.
-{{ :​public:​ukieri:​dst.jpg?​nolink&​250x400|Dunn Solar Telescope}}+ 
 +[{{ :​public:​ukieri:​dst.jpg?​nolink&​250x400|Dunn Solar Telescope}}]
  
 This project aims to provide sets of integrated research activities which will focus on training PhD students and PDRAs in ground based solar physics. The project will also address the challenges associated with the construction,​ operation and data handling of observations from the Visual Broadband Imagers (VBIs) which will be the backbone instruments on these facilities. Issues that will be addressed include the development of large format, high speed and low noise detectors, the storage and processing of data and the application of GPU based image reconstruction techniques. Addressing these issues is vital for achieving sustained diffraction limited solar imaging hence maximising the scientific return. This project aims to provide sets of integrated research activities which will focus on training PhD students and PDRAs in ground based solar physics. The project will also address the challenges associated with the construction,​ operation and data handling of observations from the Visual Broadband Imagers (VBIs) which will be the backbone instruments on these facilities. Issues that will be addressed include the development of large format, high speed and low noise detectors, the storage and processing of data and the application of GPU based image reconstruction techniques. Addressing these issues is vital for achieving sustained diffraction limited solar imaging hence maximising the scientific return.
public/research_areas/solar_physics/ukieri.txt · Last modified: 2013/09/06 13:01 by Robert Ryans

Back to Top Sitemap News